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Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Bucs' Grimm works to regain full range of motion

The Tampa Tribune
Published:   |   Updated: March 21, 2013 at 12:20 AM
TAMPA -

Buccaneers safety Cody Grimm believes he is between 85 and 90 percent recovered from last year's season-ending injury sustained against Baltimore.

Grimm broke his left fibula against the Ravens during a 17-10 loss on Nov. 28. He had surgery in Miami a couple of days later and has been rehabbing this offseason at Sullivan ProFormance in Arizona.

"They pretty much put a plate and some screws in there and reattached the fibula," Grimm said. "I had to stay off of it for nine weeks. Then they went in and took out one of the screws that holds my fibula and tibia close together so the cartilage can grow back together and get strong in between there.

"Once that happens, the fibula is good to go. Then it's all about getting the strength back and the motion back. That's the key. The bone is not the issue. Once the plate is in there, it's stronger than before."

Grimm is not the only NFL player rehabbing with trainers at Sullivan ProFormance. Others include Donovan McNabb (Washington), Shaun Rogers (Cleveland), Darrelle Revis (New York Jets) and Anquan Boldin (Baltimore).

Grimm runs for 20-30 minutes, rehabs his ankle for an hour and works out for another two hours each day.

Last season, Grimm started nine games after the suspension of safety Tanard Jackson in September. Grimm, a seventh-round pick in 2010, had 61 tackles and two interceptions prior to his injury. He also had 10 tackles on special teams.

One of Grimm's offseason priorities was getting the full range of motion back in his foot, which was in same position for several weeks after surgery. He can move it without any problems, he said.

"If we had (voluntary workouts), I think I'd be able to practice," Grimm said. "The thing right now is it's not quite as strong. I've noticed the leg gets sore faster. That's the main issue, which is getting the strength back now.

"My main concern was getting all the motion back in my foot and I've done that. Now it's just about getting my leg as strong as the other leg."

arichardson@tampatrib.com

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