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Auto Racing

Explosive NASCAR start had a bit of everything

The Associated Press
Published:   |   Updated: March 19, 2013 at 03:54 PM
DAYTONA BEACH -

Well, NASCAR certainly knows how to make a prime-time impression.

Rain, fire and Tide laundry detergent all factored into a Daytona 500 that will go down as the most bizarre in NASCAR history.

And Brad Keselowski tweeted most of it live — from his race car. Then he provided another update minutes after crashing at 190 mph.

And oh, yeah, Matt Kenseth picked up his second Daytona 500 title.

"You would think after 65 years and running all the races that NASCAR has run … that you've seen about everything," NASCAR president Mike Helton said. "You do think about, 'Oh, my gosh, if that can happen, what else can happen?' "

The first Daytona 500 to be postponed took more than 36 hours to complete after rain pushed it from its scheduled Sunday afternoon start to Monday at lunch, and ultimately turned it into the first NASCAR opener telecast in prime time.

Then Juan Pablo Montoya crashed under caution into a safety truck filled with about 200 gallons of jet fuel, and the collision caused a massive fireball that scorched the track and will be the most indelible image of the 54th running of "The Great American Race."

What did they use to clean it up? Tide laundry detergent, of course.

Seriously.

The two-plus hour stoppage turned into a tweet-up of sorts, as the drivers climbed from their cars and crowded around Keselowski, who had pulled out his phone to provide real-time updates to his fans by posting photos and answering questions. His number of followers ballooned from about 65,000 at the start of the race to almost 200,000 by the time the fire was extinguished and racing could resume.

"I thought it was pretty funny," said Dale Earnhardt Jr., whose winless streak hit 130 races when he came up short in his bid to chase down Kenseth in a two-lap overtime sprint.

"That was kind of fun actually, standing around on the back straightaway. We did take the phone and put it to some use and looked up the weather."

When the 500 finally ended in the early morning hours Tuesday, the two-week SpeedWeeks odyssey wasn't over: Fog closed the North Carolina airports, stranding drivers and teams at Daytona for yet another night.

"Now believe it or not I can't go home," fourth-place finisher Denny Hamlin posted on Twitter. "Fogged in. Yet another night in Daytona."

Regardless, the telecast was a win for Fox — its highest-rated Monday night audience since Game 5 of the 2010 World Series — with 36.5 million viewers, up 22 percent from 30 million last year.

And they were treated to a show like no other, beginning from the second lap of the race, when five-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson was caught in an accident that also collected Danica Patrick, ruining her Daytona 500 debut.

From there, it was 25 lead changes among 13 drivers, 10 cautions, and that really big fire.

"The thing that comes into my mind is NASCAR just can't catch a break," Earnhardt said. "We're trying to deliver, and we just have some unfortunate things happen such as the rain delay, potholes in the track a couple of years ago. We're a good sport, and we're trying to give a good product."

On Tuesday, NASCAR said Keselowski can keep his cellphone in his race car during events, and all drivers are encouraged to use social media.


Daytona 500 results, Page 7

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