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Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014
Letters To The Editor

Letters to the editor: Safe Act no threat to local law enforcement

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Support the Safe Act

I have the utmost respect for the long and distinguished service of Eduardo Gonzalez as a law enforcement officer. Therein lies my problem with his willingness to ignore the fact that a law has by been broken by illegal immigrants for fear of destroying the “community-based” law enforcement efforts (“Safe Act will destroy community-based policing efforts” Other Views, Aug. 31).

The reason that certain people will “avoid contact” with law enforcement and “refuse to report crimes” is that they or someone close to them has broken the law.

Do we look the other way for the sake of cooperation from them? How about a low-level drug dealer? Do we also look the other way for their cooperation? How about the petty thief? Do we also look the other way? I don’t see how this builds trust and cooperation with law enforcement when laws are applied arbitrarily.

As far as the police taking time away from major crimes to enforce federal immigration laws, it is obvious that the states feel that the federal government cannot or will not enforce those laws. It is my understanding that the Safe Act predicates immigration status questions only in conjunction with other possible crimes. That seems to be a reasonable approach to enforcing the law, not racial profiling.

I was stopped for a seat belt violation some time ago. I have a special condition that forces me to wear my belt under my arm. The officer said fine, but he wanted to run my license to be sure there were no other issues. It had nothing to do with race, just good law enforcement.

The law is the law. If not, the slope is slippery and who decides what is OK and what is not?

Jerrold Cheesbro

Sun City Center

Voucher lawsuit ironies

A news story that hasn’t received a lot of attention from the media is Attorney General Eric Holder’s recent lawsuit against the Louisiana’s school voucher program. Even though 90 percent of the children who use them are minorities and all were originally in failing schools, the Department of Justice is suing because the program is interfering with the government’s school integration plan for the state. In effect, to achieve some arbitrary racial balance, Holder is trying to deny these kids the quality education their parents want them to have.

There are two big ironies here. One is that the anti-segregation laws which are the basis for his action were created to give minorities a better education are now being used to prevent that. And two, President Obama, Holder’s boss, talks a lot about helping more Americans afford college. Yet if his attorney general succeeds, many children in Louisiana will not be ready to attend college no matter how much financial aid is available.

Tim Curtis

Tampa

Don’t support wage demand

Once again, Labor Day has brought the union activists out to promote their own interests, as opposed to the celebration of the great accomplishments of actual workers that have contributed to our nation’s economic miracle.

The fast-food workers’ strike is not about workers. It is about the Service Employees International Union and trying to intimidate small business franchisees into paying unsustainable wages to workers who desperately need to work. The past usefulness of unions is well documented; they have done much good. Today, however, they are leftist dinosaurs whose sole purpose is to maintain their overpaid leaders in power and to stop the bleeding of countless workers who are rejecting unionism.

If the professional paid thugs posing as sympathetic low-wage workers have their way, small business entrepreneurs by the thousands will be forced to go out of business because they can’t afford the exorbitant wages demanded by SEIU.

When the supply shrinks, demand and prices rise. Employees lose their jobs, investment goes overseas or to another industry. Union contracts will ensure that incompetent workers are protected and employers will see productivity reduced and costs rise. Public employee unions in Wisconsin, auto workers in Michigan and thousands of jobs lost overseas due to union non-competitiveness prove my point.

Josef Horowitz

Lutz

No business in Syria

Is it an atrocity that Assad would use poison gas? Of course it is. However, anyone who is confused or not understanding our president’s position in Syria has failed to pay attention for the past five years.

Obama has consistently proven himself a reactionary and then indecisive when questioned. His foreign policy is nonexistent. He leads not by example, but from behind.

His confusion and lack of leadership is now making the world a dangerous place. His administration tells us they do not want to go to war in Syria, rather they only wish to bomb the place. While Assad relocates his military assets to civilian neighborhoods, Obama allows him more time by transferring both the leadership along with the responsibility of our actions to the Congress.

Each member of Congress should fully understand who will be held accountable when the pictures of dead children are shown throughout the world as a result of American military action. It is my belief that to follow this lack of leadership into this “not a war” would be one huge mistake.

If you agree our country has no place in Syria do not depend on your elected officials to do the right thing. Days before the first Congressional hearings were held, Sen. Bill Nelson had already come out in support of military action, seemingly clueless to the information that would eventually be presented.

To his credit, President Obama has given you the opportunity to be heard. Please, take this opportunity to contact your representatives and tell them we have no business in Syria.

Keith A. Poot

Dade City

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