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Wednesday, Aug 27, 2014
Letters To The Editor

Letters to the editor: Red-light reaches

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Red-light reaches

Regarding “Lawmakers, keep paws off our cameras” (Letter of the Day, Feb. 17): The last time I looked, the two legislators mentioned in the letter represent me and others with similar views on these red-light cameras. That’s what business these state officials have “sticking their nose in local issues.” Do I or others have a problem with violators being ticketed for running red lights? No. What we have a problem with is these local communities misusing these devices and devising local traps, unregulated, to use as a cash cow off unsuspecting motorists.

How many “local” municipalities had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, just to adjust caution lights up to the standard length? Just like the writer doesn’t trust the statistics being printed about these devices, we can’t trust local municipalities to do what’s always right and legal when they set up these devices. There is no regulation, no standards, being followed The wolf is watching the hen house, and once the blood is in the water all the sharks want a bite.

This whole camera debacle is a farce. We pay the police to enforce traffic laws and promote safety. We don’t need another reason for government to stick its hand in our pockets.

James Woods

Brooksville

Where’s pro-USA?

I signed up to run in the 5K Gasparilla Distance Classic. Upon arriving home, I opened up the bag and looked at the T-shirts to find that both were made in China. How disappointing and hard to believe that such a fine local event with a major grocer as a sponsor could not find a local contributor or company that would supply the shirts and bags at a competitive cost.

It is a shame that our society has become so desensitized and accepting of what is happening to, and in, the United States, with job losses in manufacturing and acceptance of goods imported from communist countries with human rights issues. These countries are not our friends, so why are our businesses and politicians supporting them? In fact, many of these countries would love to destroy us.

Oh, yeah, I forgot. It is all about the dollar.

The future is still out there for a better country, but we need to develop a pro-USA plan with consensus among a majority of Americans that is understood and supported by our political and business leaders.

Mike Atkinson

Tampa

Remember this, ACLU

We used to be a free and friendly country; we were trusting and naïve. Then came 9/11, where terrorists found and used all our weaknesses. They entered our country, acquired driver’s licenses, went to flight school, even though they were on a “don’t board list.” They boarded commercial airlines with weapons and commandeered them into history.

We traded many of our freedoms that day for the sake of peace and safety. With more attacks we learn and apply more restrictions.

The ACLU must not turn their backs to these facts.

John Manone

Tampa

Has to be a better way

The Greenlight Pinellas referendum is deeply flawed. The powers that be apparently favor a 1-cent sales tax increase over a property tax hike to fuel this huge undertaking to give our county’s mass transportation system a complete overhaul.

A sales tax is a regressive tax, which will not get the necessary vote from the rank-and-file, average voters in our county who have been stuck in a long recession. Regressive taxes adversely affect the poorer segments of our population, and too many people here are still out of work or are underemployed in lower-paying positions because of massive layoffs to support such an increase in their tax burden. A 1-cent sales tax increase would also put an additional financial strain on small local businesses struggling to survive these tough economic times.

I believe that Greenlight Pinellas should have proposed other ways to finance this costly public venture by giving serious consideration to a property tax increase, or a fuel-tax increase as was done in Philadelphia, to fund a scaled-down referendum, or maybe proposed a half-cent sales tax hike as an incremental approach, and upgrade our bus system.

There’s got to be a better way than the referendum in its current form.

Robert J. Davis

St. Petersburg

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