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Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014
Letters To The Editor

Letters to the editor: Political exploitation

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Political exploitation

Once again President Obama and the far left are using distortion and division as a political tactic. In the State of the Union speech and since then, they have pounded upon the statistic that women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. But that figure is comparing all men as a whole versus all women. When you factor in things such as career choice, education, experience and the amount of work hours, the difference drops to about a nickel. Even at the White House, women on average make .12 cents less per dollar than the men there.

Some improvements could be done, but Obama and the far left deliberately choose to use a statistic that’s much less reflective of reality for pure political exploitation. So please don’t let them succeed aided by their adoring puppy dog press by believing this shameless ploy.

Howard Lockett

Tampa

Bad timing

Recently President Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage for all persons on federal contracts from $7.25 an hour to $10.10, or a 39.3 percent raise. Supporters claim that it only affects about 100,000 people. Well, what do you do for those currently making around $10.10 an hour? They got raises and increases in responsibility for hard work over the years. Suddenly, new hires with little or no experience are making the same as them. Are you going to give them a 39 percent increase? I doubt it.

There is another way to think of this. Let’s take these 100,000 people (though we know that it is probably a lot more) and see what it costs taxpayers a year: 100,000 x $2.85 (increase) x 2,000 (average hours worked in a year) equals $570,000,000 a year.

Now add at least that much to current workers who will want to be compensated with higher wages as well. Just what we need in this struggling economy.

What will happen to our economy if this order is expanded across the nation to all workers (especially those in smaller communities where the price of living is much lower than in California or New York)?

Tom Craig

Riverview

Lax policies?

I have been doing some research on the policies regarding cyberbullying, and I have come to realize there are no policies that actually prevent cyberbullying from occurring or reoccurring unless it involves a racial matter, religious matter or something that involves harassment or higher complications. This is not OK. All bullying should be taken seriously and put into the hands of the law if it gets to that point. Yes, cyberbullying is usually short-timed and tends to work itself out in the long haul. But what if it can’t be resolved? What if the bullying continues throughout a child’s education?

Paige Bezanson

St. Petersburg

Life on the line

Regarding “Union negatives” (Your Views, April 10): Cindy Conti, as many people do, misunderstands union wages. I worked for General Motors as a master/journeyman electrician after 8,000 hours of training. I started with GM in the UAW union in 1986 for $15.05 an hour. At retirement in 2006 after 21 years and 2,200 hours of continuing education, I made just under $30 an hour and was at the top pay for hourly/skilled trades. Line workers averaged about $26 an hour, and the labor on the line isn’t just putting in a bolt or two. They must complete their job in under one minute per vehicle, or the line stops.

Many of those people end up with lifelong health problems with carpal tunnel and back trouble from bending over all the time. Everyone has seen the pictures of the workers on the line reading the newspaper. What they don’t see is the worker making pencil marks on the paper after reading one or two paragraphs if he has worked quickly enough and has a few seconds left after his job while the line is moving one vehicle every 59 to 61 seconds.

In the last contract I worked under in 2006, new hires were hired at one-half the wage, after 90 days or so, and never got a raise after that. Retirement pensions were done away with altogether. In our plant over 550 robots were installed and took over 1,500 jobs.

People need to get their facts straight or they look like a fool when they open their mouths.

Dan Chalfant

Land O’ Lakes

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