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Tuesday, Jul 22, 2014
Douglas MacKinnon

It’s time to question the cornerstone of the Obama narrative

Published:

I have often said that people tend to embrace the truth right up until the moment it reflects poorly upon them or their cause.

It’s human nature, and it’s part of who we are. The knee-jerk reaction for many human beings when proved wrong, to be at fault or to have made a mistake is to deny, make excuses or even go on the attack hoping to change the subject.

Coming up on exactly 10 years ago, on July 27, 2004, Barack Obama — then candidate for the Senate in Illinois — was carefully handpicked to deliver the keynote address for the Democratic National Convention. It was the defining decision that put him firmly on the path to the presidency.

About that same time — especially after much of the mainstream media swooned over his delivery of remarks written by the John Kerry team — the narrative of the then-42-year-old political neophyte was either begun, or was quickly being enhanced.

The cornerstone of that narrative being that “Barack Obama is brilliant.”

My question then, and especially now as we witness misstep after misstep from the Obama White House, being: What if he is not brilliant? What if he is, in fact, less than brilliant?

What if that reality is the simple truth? Is that a truth that can be embraced by the media, the left, or those who are fans of Obama?

Questioning the intelligence of Republican presidents and Republican presidential candidates has long been in vogue within the mainstream media and the Democratic Party, and has even been a blood sport for some. It has been done so many times that if you research it, your computer might melt from the millions of hits instantly flooding into your system.

So, if one were to question the brilliance of, say, a Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bob Dole or George W. Bush, that’s fair game. But if you dare to question the brilliance of Barack Obama, not only might your motives be questioned, but you also stand a real chance of being labeled in the worst way possible.

Because I did work in the White House for two Republican presidents, I understand my “bias” on this subject will be highlighted or used as justification to ignore my argument. That’s OK. Human nature once again at work.

That said, about a decade ago, I morphed into an “independent conservative” not fond of the entrenched establishment from either political party. As our country and most of the world continue to spiral deeper into chaos and uncertainty, I think it’s more imperative than ever that we know exactly who and what we are getting in our elected officials, especially when it comes to the president of the United States.

For Barack Obama, the narrative — and to some, the “law of the land” — became that he was brilliant. Maybe he is. As Obama hasn’t released all of his academic records and much pertaining to his private life, that will be something for future historians to answer. Well … at least those not already in the tank for Obama.

A few years ago, “historian” Michael Beschloss discussed the intelligence of Obama with radio host Don Imus.

Beschloss — who leans left as do most “historians” in the national spotlight — said in part: “Even aside from the fact of electing the first African-American president and whatever one’s partisan views, this is a guy whose IQ is off the charts.”

Imus then naturally asked: “What is his IQ?”

Beschloss: “Uh, I would say it’s probably — he’s probably the smartest guy ever to become president.”

Imus: “That’s not what I asked you. I asked you what his IQ was.”

Beschloss: “You know, I don’t know and I’d have to find someone with more expertise.”

Beschloss’ embarrassing and sycophantic response aside, six years and multiple miscalculations into the Obama presidency, it might be wise to question the spin of his handlers and allies.

Just as it is critically important to question the spin from anyone pushing the next wave of presidential candidates — Democrat or Republican.

If we choose for partisan or personal reasons to turn a blind eye to the hype and accept the false narratives, then we will surely continue to get the government we deserve.

That said, it will be far from the future our children and grandchildren deserve.

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